Tag archives: family

Who Knew Downsizing Could Feel So Liberating? Bookmark and Share

Last week I moved from a fairly large house with a yard and a garage into a one-bedroom hotel suite with a view of the shopping mall. It’s a temporary downsizing, and maybe that’s why, so far, it feels surprisingly good.

There is something wonderfully simple about having only four plates, four bowls and four forks. It takes less than five minutes to clean up the kitchen—no dishwasher required. Knickknacks aren’t cluttering the end tables and dresser tops. Getting dressed in the morning takes little time at all when all of your clothes fit into one ...

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My mother: what I still have time say Bookmark and Share

Yesterday, I read an amazing post by Megan O’Rourke, whose mother died when she was 32, called “My Mother: What I wish I could say.” It is a touching tribute to the little and big things that we can longer say once someone is gone. It inspired me to write this post because I am lucky enough to have this day to say some of the things that I haven’t said.

I hope you’ll share with me the things you want to say to your mother (or whomever), but more important I hope it inspires you to ...

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Tradition—what we shed and what we keep Bookmark and Share

Tradition—what we shed and what we keep

Ah, Christmas. What other time of year has more traditions wrapped around it? It seems that as a species, humans thrive on tradition and as much as we sometimes complain about it, we will create traditions where there is a hole.

As a child growing up, my Christmases followed the same rhythm each year. Christmas Eve we went to “the barn,” a live reenactment of Jesus’s birth in a real barn, sitting on real hay bales next to sheep and a donkey with members of our church acting out the scenes (I was the first live baby Jesus). Audience ...

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The return of lazy Sundays Bookmark and Share

The return of lazy Sundays

This morning my daughter climbed into our bed to snuggle, and a tickle monster attack ensued followed by a game of “pillow” (in which one person wants to sleep and the other is the moving pillow).

These mornings remind me of my childhood. My brothers and I jumping onto my parents’ bed, my dad heating up the griddle for pancakes and bacon. I don’t know if this was rare in my childhood home or if it happened every weekend, but it is a strong memory. I can nearly smell the syrup. In my memory, childhood weekends consisted of cleaning ...

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