Tag archives: growing up

Never Say Never Bookmark and Share

Never Say Never

Back in college, we used to play a little game called “I Never.” Perhaps you’ve heard of it? One person says something they’ve never done and those who have done said thing must drink.

It’s an excellent way to learn people’s deepest darkest secrets, thereby creating lifelong friendships based on fear that the horrible things you’ve done could be shared. The game creates way stronger bonds than pinky swearing.

As my college years passed, more things were taken off my “I never” list. Some of these items were originally on the “I would never” list ...

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We All Become Orphans at Some Point Bookmark and Share

I’ve been thinking of my grandfather lately, which is odd because he passed away two decades ago and I haven’t thought much about him since. The ugly truth is that his death didn’t really affect me, and it wasn’t all that surprising.

Though my grandfather was only 69 at the time, he had already suffered one heart attack and had developed emphysema caused by years of smoking a pipe. A number of his siblings had already died of heart disease.

What I remember most about his funeral was my dad’s grief and how it baffled ...

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Glory in the Monotony of Being Present Bookmark and Share

When you are about to drive 1,000 miles across America’s heartland, it’s hard not to wonder if you’ll make it or simply fall asleep and drive into a field. Anyone who has driven across the barren nothingness of Nebraska will understand.

I intended to contemplate life along this drive, to process the past six months and to consider what I wanted the future to hold. Instead, I learned that pure monotony can actually help you stay in the present. Apparently the drive through Nebraska is similar to being at a meditation retreat. It is that boring ...

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Could you live mid-life with the intensity of a teenager? Bookmark and Share

In a recent article in New York Magazine (Why You Truly Never Leave High School), author Jennifer Senior points to recent studies that suggest memories from the ages of 15 to 25 are most vividly retained. Certainly there are many neurological reasons behind this, but to me it boils down to this: Why wouldn’t we have the most intense memories from the time during which we felt things most intensely?

Do you remember what it was like to feel the body-and-soul anguish when a best friend turned on you? Or the way your heart nearly burst with joy when ...

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